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༒ ☬ ꧁ ꧂ ☆ 彡 ★ ≋ ✞ ✰ ➳ ❦ ❁ ❀ ✧ ༄ ™ ♛ → ↳ 【 】 ☾ ✿ ⚘ ༺ ༻ ☠ 乂 § ۝ ⚜ ࿐ ᴹᴿ°᭄ Sᴋ᭄ ᴮᴼˢˢ Aᴋ᭄ ⪻ ⪼ ༆ ࿔᭄ྀ ⊱ 𖣘 ⌁ ༄ᶦᶰᵈ᭄ ᴾᴿᴼ ᭄ YT ᭄ ❖ ⁂ ✸ ❅ ✢ ✦ ✪ ≛ ☊ © ‱ ✁ ✆ ✎ ☞ ☛ ☟ ☜ ☚ ♬ ♫ ♪

Good Aesthetic Names


In the world of tattoos, sometimes we hear terms like 'Sailor Joe' and 'Bassai Bob', however, those aren't actually tattoo names, but they are names used to categorize an individual's tattoo. Why would anyone want their tattoo named after them? Aside, from the fact that it makes you feel special (which is what they are trying to do) or the fact that you're going to have a hard time getting rid of it in the future (which we know how difficult that can be), having a specific name for your ink can also help when trying to find matching tattoos later down the line. If you have a buddy or two that has the same tattoo as you, it can save you a lot of hassle when trying to locate the exact design you want.

 

An example of an anatomical name would be "Kung Fu Panda". This is not meant to be offensive, but the term itself is quite fitting given the content of the original animation. The full name, Kung Fu Panda is "Kung Fu Panda" and it can also be a name that people give when first introducing themselves. A more generic example would be "Bassai Bob". This might be a name that someone gives to a fictional character, but it also works well in a tattoo.

 

There are lots of good reasons to use anatomical names in your ink, but it's just something to consider. I have had friends that have had the same tattoos as I have and they did not appreciate it at all. I personally would avoid names that are too general, unless they have some sort of significance behind them. You don't want to get an 'anny piece' tattoo if your middle name is Smith. A tattoo is supposed to represent YOU, not your middle name.

There are many categories of names used in art, especially in the visual arts, such as colors, themes and environments. An artistic name is a description of an element or setting with which a work of art projects. For example, in painting, the term 'theme' refers to a particular design or style. Aesthetic names therefore describe a general idea or feeling attached to a specific image or painting. They can also be used to label parts of a work - for instance a frame can be called the 'central image' and the rest of the work the 'fill images'.

 

The aim behind choosing aesthetic names is not to name something that has already been discovered, but to find names that evoke feelings, and so become trademarks for visual artists. There are different ways of naming things that have special meaning to an artist - e.g.Aristotle's 'Socrates' becomes the name of a philosophical essay written by the Greek philosopher and teacher. Similarly, names that communicate ideas and concepts easily can be chosen. For instance, if you want your work to have some recognisable characteristics, then 'Aristotle's' is a good choice because it sounds like a name of an area of study and not of a person.

 

Names of things that have been made into works of art can actually be copyrighted - so long as they are descriptive enough of the work. For example, in some famous paintings, there are clear indications of Picasso's Picasso style - but when you see the painting, you cannot exactly say what style it belongs to. So the name Picasso actually protects the work from being used illegally. It also protects the identity of the artist who created it. Therefore it has been found that Picasso's name does not infringe on any copyright by becoming a trademark of his own distinct artistic style.


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